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anymore that we thought it had. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles tour go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now on booktv robert sullivan presents a history of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don
are an economic engine of innovation for the cities, the region, for the country and world. >> host: by the way, is this the original location, where we are in the university center area? >> guest: we are in university city in west philadelphia. penn originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia and ten moves to west philadelphia, and what we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> host: here's the book. s conspiracy of compromise by governing demanding it, and campaigns underminds it. amy and dennis the co-authors. this is "booktv" on c-span 2. >> host: on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942, buffalo, new york, university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> guest: at a woman who committed suicide at the hotel in buffalo during that year, and a photographer happened to be passing by and took the picture that appeared in "life" at the time and one widely acclaimed award for having been able to catch the moment at the pern's death, at the moment in which the person was about t
is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to discover -- discover that the cockpit, it's the kind of -- i mean you don't mention it in the book. but now we know that? added that escaped us? did you start out knowing that new jersey to markets see the entire revolution. >> someone reminded me, we lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he was trying to get votes in new jersey. but he kept saying, i kno
. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> guest: cases from the federal territories had come in the 19th century via, especially utah, questions of polygamy, but from the states, the really major cases made it to the supreme court in the late 1930s and early 1940s, really, that new deal era, and they tended not so much to be the salvation army, but the johova witnesses that caused trouble. >> host: what was one of the cases, walk us through. >> guest: an interesting case called cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gon
of innovation for our city, for our region, and for the country in the world. >> is this the original location, where we are? >> no. we are in university city in west philadelphia. pan originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia, and been moved to west philadelphia and will we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> and once again, here is the book. it is the spirit of compromise, governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. this is book tv on c-span2. >> every weekend book tv authors -- offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed awards for having been able to capture the moment as the per
, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugur
poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the cases from the federal territory had come in the 19th century and questions of polygamy and that some of the state's and the major cases made it to the court in the late 1930's and early 1940's, really that new deal era and they tended not to be so much the salvation army of the jehovah's witness who also caused a lot of troubles. >> what was one of those cases? walk us through. >> well a very interesting case called cantwell agai
places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the s
gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight e
on the northern cities that we associate with, but in the rural and small-town south through more garbage out in the southern states than there are anywhere else in the united states and it's also an international movement sewing really cover really interested in this and one of the things i discovered in the book is finishing the nation under our feet i was having to rely on what i thought would be a secondary literature on the movement in the united states and i discover they're basically was one the there is a lot who as you know is a controversial figure but in terms of who joined, who was moved by it, who embraced the vision and with the understanding was, there was virtually nothing so the kind of cobbled things together and i thought i really need to know more about this. and one of the things in this book is what historians don't write about and why. there are certain episodes or certain interpretations that scare you in the face but somehow you refuse them or ignore them, and darbee is really one of them. almost any historian conversing with african-american history would acknowledge
cities that we associate with it, but in the rural and small towns south. there were more in the southern states than there are anywhere else in the united states, and it's also an international movement so i was really, really interested in this, and one of the things i discovered in this, and the reason it's in the book, is that as i finished "nation under our feet," i thought i'd rely on a secondary literature on the movement in the united states, and i discovered there basically was known. there's a lot on garby, himself, a very controversial figure, but in terms of who joined the unia, who was moved by it, who embraced the vision and what their understanding was, there was virtually nothing, and so in in "nation under our feet," i cobbled things together, and i thought i really need to know more about this. a theme in the book is what historians don't write about and why. why is it that there's certain episodes or certain interpretations that stare you in the face, but somehow you refuse them or ignore them, and he's really one of almost any historian with african-american history wo
in the city of boston. so just right outside this building itself. now we are going to turn to the panel discussion, which is in the fashion of a question-and-answer session. this mike in the middle of the i/o is for you to step up to, ask your questions to the panel. right now i will introduce you to the panelists. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a s
, a renowned citizen of our state, and city, and known as the queen of creole quizine. she -- cuisine. we wanted the senate to congratulate her on that milestone and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the resolution will be received and properly referred. the senator from pennsylvania. mr. casey: thank you, mr. president. tonight as we -- today i should say as we confront a whole range of difficult issues at the end of this year and at the end of the congress, we should also be reminded that we have fighting men and women serving for us all around the world. we think especially tonight of those serving in afghanistan, and those who served part of that time in iraq. at various times we've come to the floor and recited the chaims of those who were killed -- names of those killed in action and tonight i'm i'm joined by my colleague, senator tom to read -- toomey who read the names of those who as lincoln said gave their last full measure of devotion to their country, those killed in action in afghanistan over parts of 2011 and 2012. i'll turn and yield the floor to my colleague, senat
ddt on a million civilians in italy and halted a typhus outbreak threatened the city. well, through the 1940s and 1850s and early 1960s, ddt kind of goes everywhere. and as it does, other insect sites chemically similar are developed, so there is a hole every of pesticides coming common use initially in military settings, but then after the war and forestry, agriculture, residential, things used in hospitals, commercial buildings and homes and lots and lots of different products. one of the problems for spraying poison from airplanes as it's really hard to control where it goes and yet this was done extensively. these are all classic. i grew up in florida where there was encephalitis as an epidemic that corrupted because the mosquitoes transmit brain disease. tracks like this have come from a neighborhood of limited my brothers and i would get his teeth into that mark as they possibly could because it was really fun. again, it was everywhere, thought to be harmless to people. although, i should say that carson's entries in ddt was based on evidence that it is not entirely safe. agai
in the city. through the 1940s in the 1950s and into the early 1960s, ddt goes everywhere and acid jazz, other insect decide chemically similar insecticide that develops another is the whole red pesticides in common use. initially a military setting, but then after the war and forestry, aquaculture, residential. these things are used in hospitals, commercial buildings and lots of different projects. one of the problems are spreading poison from airplanes as it's really hard to control where it goes and yet the system extensively. these are all classics. i grew up in florida preservice encephalitis, an epidemic against a brain disease and tracks like this that come through my neighborhood than i did my brothers and i would run out and get his teeth into the murky as we possibly could because it was really fun. i can, it is everywhere, thought to be harmless to people. although i should say that person's interest in ddt was based on evidence that it is not entirely safe. fish and wildlife service has started testing d.c. at a research facility in maryland in 1945. in the very beginning of his cl
across the commonwealth of pennsylvania, towns and cities, dallas town, easton, philadelphia and erie, there are certain values that are deeply rooted in these communities. the importance of family, the importance of faith, the importance of community, and the importance of public service, including very much service to this nation. the conviction that freedom is worth defending is one of those convictions and a belief that a cause worth fighting for is not someone else's responsibility. these are the values that have shaped these men and women, their families, their churches and houses of worship, their communities. and these values were exemplified in the lives of our fallen men and women in service. and they'll forever be honored by pennsylvanians as the native sons and daughters of our great commonwealth for their service to the country. and now, mr. president, i will read the names of the men and women who have made the supreme sacrifice for our country in this conflict and senator casey will complete the list that i will now begin. private first class david anthony jefferson, un
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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